President Joe Biden to host German chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House

President Biden will host German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House Thursday ahead of the longtime leader’s exit from office in September.

The two are expected to endorse the “Washington Declaration” outlining their common vision for cooperation on shared policy challenges and their commitment to upholding democracy and the international rules-based order.

A senior administration official said that “President Biden will convey gratitude” for Merkel’s leadership role in Europe and around the world. Merkel has been Germany’s Chancellor for nearly 16 years. While the U.S. and Germany share deep, historical ties and a robust economic and military relationship, the two countries are at odds over key issues including Berlin’s pursuit of a Russian natural gas pipeline, called Nord Stream 2.

The administration views the pipeline, which is considered about 90 to 95 percent complete, a geo-strategic threat that allows Russia to threaten Ukraine by diverting key economic revenue related to natural gas delivery to Europe, while also raising the risk that Moscow’s control of such a pipeline gives it dangerous leverage over Germany and Europe. “I do expect that President Biden will raise his longstanding concerns with Chancellor Merkel during their meeting about Russia’s geopolitical project and about the importance of developing concrete mechanisms to ensure that energy is not used as a coercive tool against Ukraine, our Eastern Flank allies, or any other country,” the senior administration official said in a briefing with reporters Wednesday ahead of Merkel’s visit.

The Biden administration in May waived sanctions on the Nord Stream 2 construction in an effort to ease tensions with Germany and says it has shifted its strategy to prevent the pipeline from becoming operational. “We believe that the sanctions waivers that we announced in May have given us diplomatic space to be able to work with Germany, to have these conversations, to try and find ways to address the negative impacts of the pipeline,” the official said. “Our teams have been discussing these concerns. I expect that they will continue discussing these concerns.”

The U.S. and Germany are also at odds over a decision to waive intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines. The Biden administration believes that greater access to the development of the vaccine will help increase its distribution globally. The administration came out in May in support of waiving the trade protections, called the TRIPS waiver, but it was quickly rejected by Berlin. “The protection of intellectual property is a source of innovation and must remain so in the future,” a German government spokeswoman said in a statement at the time, Reuters reported.

The senior administration official, speaking to reporters on Wednesday, downplayed tensions over the TRIPS waiver and said Biden and Merkel will continue discussions about how to ramp up vaccine production and distribution around the world and through COVAX, the global vaccine alliance. “We’re encouraged that our announcement in May has encouraged other countries to be able to put additional proposals and ideas on the table,” the official said. “And I think that this broad goal is very much one that President Biden and Chancellor Merkel share in terms of their joint commitment to COVAX, the contributions that the United States, that Germany, the EU, and other countries made at the G7 — and do expect that they will continue to have conversations about how we can ensure the widest distribution of vaccines on a very rapid timeframe to a number of countries around the world as the best and most effective way of ultimately ending the pandemic.” Other issues on the agenda include shared priorities in shoring up global health security, addressing climate change, shared security challenges in Afghanistan, Libya, and the Sahel.

The two leaders will address European regional challenges such as Russian cyberattacks and territorial aggression and countering China’s rising influence, human rights abuses and rogue economic practices. They will also express commitments to shoring up democracy at home and defending human rights, democratic institutions and the rule of law around the world.

The German leader’s schedule on Thursday will include a working breakfast with Vice President Harris at the Vice President’s residence. She will meet with Biden in the afternoon at the White House, first for a one-on-one meeting, followed by an expanded bilateral meeting and a press conference.

In the evening, Biden will host Merkel for a small dinner with a “range of individuals,” the official said, that include supporters of the bilateral relationship between the U.S. and Germany.

The visit will mark a notable shift from the former Trump administration, where conflicts and clashes dominated the relationship, as the former president threatened to pull out of NATO and denigrated traditional transatlantic alliances that have dominated international norms since World War II.

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South Africa: Zuma buys time as Constitutional court accepts to examine appeal on July 12 | Africanews

“South Africa: Zuma buys time as Constitutional court accepts to examine appeal on July 12 | Africanews” https://www.africanews.com/2021/07/04/south-africa-zuma-buys-time-as-constitutional-court-accepts-to-examine-appeal-on-july-12/

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Child fight for her life taking the ‘most expensive drug in the world’

Child fights for her life by taking the ‘most expensive drug in the world’ “We weren’t sure if she was gonna be alive,” father Rory Devine said. ByAshley Riegle,Knez Walker, andAnthony Rivas May 18, 2021, 9:37 AM • 14 min read 3:11 On Location: May 18, 2021 Catch up on the developing stories making headlines. ABC News Ceri and Rory Devine welcomed their first child, Rhys, into the world three months before COVID-19 shut down the country. It wasn’t long before the new parents from Redondo Beach, California, began to see the hampering effects of the lockdown on their ability to address unsettling signs in their daughter’s development. “There was no comparisons for children because of the pandemic.

So we never had the sort of side-by-side or interactions or anything like that, either, so that was really difficult,” Rory Devine told “Nightline.” Rhys was born on Dec. 4, 2019, after what her parents described as a perfectly normal pregnancy. But while she looked healthy on the surface, on the inside, she was already losing ground. It would take months for her parents to realize it. “We got to about three, four months, and I noticed she wasn’t moving as much as other babies,” Ceri Devine said. ABC News Rhys Devine was born with a degenerative neuromuscular disease called spinal muscular atrophy, whic…Read More Rhys was missing milestones associated with the normal development of a baby; her parents said she wasn’t performing simple movements, like trying to raise her head and moving her legs. “You pick her up and she slips right through your fingers because she’s got no muscle tone,” Ceri Devine said. “It’s like holding a 19-pound newborn.

” Watch the full story on “Nightline” TONIGHT at 12:35 a.m. ET on ABC. As COVID-19 forced doctors into telemedicine, the Devines were relegated to explaining Rhys’ condition to her doctor virtually. Rory Devine said doctors consistently told them Rhys only had low muscle tone. She was placed on a physical therapy regimen, but her condition continued to worsen. Ceri Devine said that by 6 months old, Rhys still wasn’t able to move her legs. Watching other people’s children growing up on Instagram, she said she’d get “frustrated” because their kids were already sitting up despite being months younger. “The entire time this was going on, I was saying, ‘Look, the doctor said it’s fine. It’s fine. I was a slow developer,'” Rory Devine said he’d told his wife. “And she was the one who was consistently saying there’s something wrong.” ABC News Rory Devine told ABC News that every time he and his wife, Ceri Devine, would talk to a doctor abou…Read More The family was finally able to schedule an in-person appointment with a pediatrician on May 27, 2020. It was during this appointment that the doctor told them Rhys might have a neurodegenerative disease called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA.

The condition is typically inherited when both parents carry the mutated version of a gene that helps the body maintain its motor neurons. The disease causes the loss of these specialized nerve cells and weakens movement in the muscles, and it worsens with age, according to the National Institutes of Health. “Those nerve cells die over time,” said Dr. Mary Schroth, chief medical officer of the nonprofit Cure SMA. “People with SMA lose the ability to walk, to sit up, even to swallow and to breathe.” ABC News Dr.

Mary Schroth is a pediatric pulmonologist and chief medical officer of the nonprofit Cure SMA. Sh…Read More SMA affects about 1 in 8,000 to 10,000 people worldwide. Rhys was diagnosed with the most common form of the disease — type 1, also known as Werdnig-Hoffmann disease — which affects about half of those diagnosed, according to the NIH. “The first thing when you look it up on Google is most infants diagnosed with SMA type 1 do not live past 2 years of age,” Ceri Devine said.

Now keenly aware of their daughter’s deteriorating health, the Devine’s quickly sought help from neurologist Dr. Perry Shieh at the University of California, Los Angeles. Shieh, an expert on SMA who’s treated about 100 babies with the disease, confirmed Rhys’ diagnosis. Shieh said it’s difficult diagnosing SMA because so many babies born with it “look essentially normal.” But he said a lot of those babies “never obtain the ability to sit. So they miss that milestone.” ABC News Dr. Perry Shieh is a neurologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who’s treated dozen…Read More “When we see babies or children missing their milestones, it gets us concerned,” he said.

The confirmation of their daughter’s condition devastated the new parents. Ceri Devine said that while out on walks, she’d see other kids living their lives normally, “running around, on their scooters,” and it’d make her think about how Rhys will “probably never do that.” “We weren’t sure if she was gonna be alive,” Rory Devine added. “I had almost come to terms with the fact, I’m like, ‘Well, this will destroy us.’ Like, no couple can survive the loss of their first kid.” In recent years, however, new advances in SMA treatments have begun to help the thousands of children diagnosed with the disease. Rhys began receiving a gene therapy called Spinraza shortly after her diagnosis.

The drug is injected directly into cerebrospinal fluid in the patient’s lower back, according to Cure SMA, and is meant to fix the splicing errors in the mutated genes. ABC News Rhys Devine with her mother, Ceri Devine, during a visit to the doctor for her spinal muscular atrophy. But the drug is expensive, costing a total of about $650,000 to $750,000 in the first year — when the patient is given “loading doses” — and then about $375,000 for each year afterward. It must be taken every four months for the duration of the patient’s life.

With that long-term financial burden looming, the Devines began to look at a newer gene therapy option called Zolgensma. The one-time shot delivers a functional version of the mutated or missing gene that causes SMA, according to the Food and Drug Administration. It’s meant for children under 2 years old, and the earlier a child receives it, the higher their chance of living a relatively normal life. “It’s a degenerative condition, so it’s a progressive condition,” Shieh said.

“Another way to think about it is you’re sliding downhill and there’s really no way to go back up the hill. So what you want to do is provide some type of treatment that prevents this child from sliding further down the hill.” But Zolgensma isn’t cheap, either. In fact, it has been called the most expensive drug in the world, with one dose costing over $2 million. During their ordeal with Rhys, the Devines continued to work full time. Ceri Devine is a red carpet event planner while her husband works in recruiting.

But while they were fortunate enough to have health insurance, the approval process for Zolgensma is complicated and time-consuming, Ceri Devine said. “I spent just all day, every day on the phone with the insurance company,” she said. ABC News Ceri and Rory Devine talk to ABC News about their daughter Rhys’ progress since receiving a gr…Read More Novartis, which manufactures Zolgensma, said the price of the drug is comparable to other gene therapies and that on average, it’ll only cost about half of what a family would spend on other SMA treatments over a decade.

The company also said that families with insurance coverage are likely to pay far less than the label price. “We currently have policies in place that cover about 97% of commercial patients, and Medicaid access continues to progress with [about] 86% of lives covered,” the company said in a statement. “I think anybody who has a child, anybody who cares for somebody who has SMA, it’s definitely worth it,” Shieh said. “It is life-changing. It’s lifesaving.” Although she said it makes her feel “sick to think that there’s a price tag on a child’s life,” Ceri Devine said she was willing to do anything necessary to ensure Rhys received the drug. “I said to Rory, ‘If this is what she has … and we have to get this treatment, we’ll do whatever it takes to get it.’ I said I would sell my organs,” Ceri Devine said. “I was prepared to move back home … with my parents if we had to.

It didn’t really faze me because the cost of it didn’t matter. Whatever it took, we were gonna get our daughter this medication.” Three months after Rhys was diagnosed with SMA, the Devines’ persistence paid off. Rhys was given the injection of Zolgensma on Aug. 14, 2020. And just three days later, her parents began seeing signs that the drug was working, when she lifted her head without their help, Rory Devine said.

ABC News “It’s my hope that she’ll be able to walk and take steps and have some independence,” Ceri Devine…Read More Rhys’ strength continued to progress and she soon began to achieve the milestones for which the Devines had waited too long. By November 2020, Ceri Devine said Rhys had begun to sit unassisted on her own. “She’s made some wonderful gains,” Shieh said. “She’s lifting her arms up more than when I first met her, she’s lifting her legs up more.

She’s breathing a bit better. So, I’m quite optimistic that she’ll be able to continue to gain some motor skills and some other milestones.” ABC News Rhys Devine sits on her own after undergoing a gene therapy for her spinal muscular atrophy. Prior…Read More While monitoring Rhys’ progress after the Zolgensma shot, Ceri Devine joined a Facebook group of parents of kids with SMA — many of whom did not know what SMA was until their child was diagnosed. Only 36 states currently mandate SMA screening for infants, meaning that nationwide, more than a quarter of children are never screened for the disease. California enacted its screening mandate six months after Rhys was born.

“For SMA, newborn screening saves lives,” Schroth said. “It’s an important disease to diagnose early and treat early. … It warms my heart so much to know that patients may not need my services someday. As a pediatric pulmonologist, I am good with that. Or, they [will] need different services from me. I’m just so happy not to grieve with the family’s who’s losing their child.” Rhys, who’s now 18 months old, has become capable of rolling over on her own and, although she sits in a wheelchair to get around, she’s been learning to stand with the help of specialized shoes, leg braces and a physical therapy machine.

In February, she stood up by herself for a total of three seconds. ABC News Ceri Devine performs stretching exercises on her daughter, Rhys, who was born with spinal mu…Read More Although she continues to undergo breathing treatments and different physical therapy exercises, the Devines are hopeful Rhys will continue to improve. “No mom wants to see their kid in a wheelchair forever,” Ceri Devine said. “It’s my hope that she’ll be able to walk and take steps and have some independence. … But, realistically, she will probably have a wheelchair as her primary mode of getting around.” ABC News “Anytime she does anything, it’s a celebration.

I feel like we wanna throw a party,” Ceri Devine said of…Read More They also hope that by sharing Rhys’ story, more families with children with SMA will be able to access treatment early and experience the same success. “We can’t stop it from happening to anyone else, but [we can] just educate people on what SMA is,” Ceri Devine said. “There are these treatments for it and the sooner you catch it, the better off these babies will be.”

Malaria vaccine trial raises hope of beating disease.

Malaria vaccine trial raises hope of beating the deadly disease A mosquito is bloated with blood as it inserts its stinger   –  

2 hours ago Malaria A candidate malaria vaccine has demonstrated an unprecedented 77 percent efficacy in trials in Africa, raising hopes of a breakthrough in the fight against the disease that kills mostly children, its developer Oxford University announced Friday.

The vaccine, R21/Matrix-M, is the first to reach the 75% efficacy target set by the World Health Organisation (WHO), said the university, which is collaborating with the US company Novavax. Published in the scientific journal, The Lancet, “these new results give great hope in the potential of this vaccine”, commented Professor Adrian Hill, director of the Jenner Institute at Oxford University, which also developed the anti-Covid vaccine with AstraZeneca.

The serum, which will be approved within two years, offers hope at a time when fears of malaria resistance to treatment are growing.

The parasitic disease has killed more than 400,000 people worldwide by 2019, two-thirds of children under five. According to the WHO, the overwhelming majority of cases (94% of the 229 million infections worldwide) and deaths occur in Africa.

According to a 2019 phase II trial of 450 children aged between 5-17 months in Burkina Faso, the Oxford University vaccine showed 77% efficacy in those given a high dose of the jab, and 71% in those given a lower dose.

  No serious side effects were observed. Recruitment of 4,800 children in four African countries has begun for the final phase of the clinical trials.

The vaccine can be manufactured on a large scale and at a lower cost, the developers said. A partnership has been formed with the Serum Institute in India (SII), which already produces the Oxford/AstraZeneca covid vaccine, to “manufacture at least 200 million doses annually over the next few years”, according to Adrian Hill.

Another vaccine, developed by the British giant GSK, has already been administered to some 650,000 children since 2019 in Malawi, Ghana, and Kenya as part of a pilot program launched by the WHO. This has been proved to be less effective, preventing 4 out of 10 cases of malaria and 3 out of 10 cases of severe, life-threatening malaria.

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See why President Joe Behavior change

Pinterest Linkedin POLITICS & POLICY With Alexei Navalny in danger, do Biden’s Russia sanctions mean anything? For Biden, sanctions are meant to stabilize the future U.S.-Russian relationship. But something unexpected — Navalny’s death, for example — could change the calculus.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny makes a heart shape with his hands from inside a glass cell during a court hearing in Moscow on Feb. 2, 2021.Moscow City Court via AFP – Getty Images April 19, 2021, 10:06 PM GMT By Kathryn Stoner, deputy director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University Last Wednesday, the Biden administration announced yet another round of sanctions on Russia.

The sanctions were quickly characterized by some as weak and likely to be ineffectual in changing Russian behavior, while others have called them the toughest and broadest in three years. This Wednesday, Russians are expected to take to the streets en masse in support of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny, who is in the third week of a hunger strike and was transferred Monday from a Russian prison to a hospital nearby because he is reportedly near death. Biden national security adviser Jake Sullivan told CNN on Sunday that there will be further consequences should Navalny die as a result of his treatment (or lack thereof) in the Russian prison system. Recommended OPINION Why Andrew Yang (still) isn’t ready for prime time Biden national security adviser Jake Sullivan told CNN on Sunday that there will be further consequences should Navalny die as a result of his treatment (or lack thereof) in the Russian prison system.

But in the context of Russia, what do consequences mean? Previous rounds of sanctions under former Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump don’t appear to have ended Russia’s increasingly aggressive challenges to the United States, or its assault on human rights domestically. A reasonable observer might ask, therefore, why does President Joe Biden bother? Sanctions, by nature, are a relatively weak and imprecise instrument of pressure in international relations. They can take years to actually change the behavior of the targeted state, if they ever actually do. Still, sanctions can matter a great deal depending on what the goal is and the broader context. In this most recent case, we need to remember that the goal of this round of sanctions is not to topple Russian President Vladimir Putin’s increasingly autocratic regime; nor is the point of them to force Russia to withdraw from the long-simmering conflict in eastern Ukraine; nor were they intended to destroy the Russian government’s ability to conduct cyber hacking into American firms, as it did in 2020 with the SolarWinds attack.

Russian opposition politician urges U.S. & Western nations Instead, the purpose was to send a simple and direct message that Biden intends to punish past malign behavior and to deter similar attacks in the future by increasing the cost of doing so for Putin’s regime. Biden also doubtless wants to signal that his approach to Russia will be rather different from that of his predecessor, the Putin-adoring Trump. For the first time, in this set of sanctions, the United States is going directly after an important aspect of the Russian economy by banning American financial institutions from purchasing Russian government debt.

American institutions can still hold Russian debt, but Biden’s sanctions prohibit American firms from buying new Russian government bonds directly from the Russian Central Bank, Ministry of Finance, and the Russian Direct Investment Fund.

Although these bonds can still be purchased on the secondary market, the effect of the sanctions will be to make Russian bonds less attractive to investors. Related OPINION A poisoned dissident, a damning video and a real challenge to Putin’s 20-year presidency Informed readers will argue that Russia doesn’t actually have that much debt anyway, so this won’t matter to its overall macroeconomic health. That’s true; Russia has a relatively low debt to gross domestic product, or GDP ratio (most recent figures from the World Bank put it at 14.2 percent vs. the U.S at 99.0 percent.) This is a fact that is often overlooked amid the mistaken narrative that the Russian economy is incurably weak.

But again, the intention of these sanctions is to make things a little more uncomfortable for Putin’s government, not to have a truly disastrous effect on the Russian economy. Russian decisionmakers should be reminded by this set of sanctions that the United States could really mess with Russia’s economy should we so choose. Biden could indeed go much farther if the need arises in future. He could, for example, cut Russia off from the global SWIFT financial transaction and communication system, which would prohibit the completion of electronic international monetary transactions. In theory, the U.S could sanction any company that does business with Russia, period. But these would be extreme measures that presumably would be a last resort and in response to much greater provocations by Russia.

Given this context, Biden seems to have made a very reasonable first move — using sticks and carrots to both punish and hopefully re-engage meaningfully with Russia after the instability of the last four years under Trump. There is no contradiction between imposing sanctions that are deep enough to get the Russians’ attention, while also offering a presidential bilateral meeting.

Indeed, even after issuing countersanctions at the end of the week, Russian officials kept their response proportionate: expelling 10 American diplomats and banning a few American officials from Russia who likely never wanted to go there anyway. Related OPINION We want to hear what you THINK. Please submit a letter to the editor. Conspicuously absent in the official Russian reaction to Biden’s new sanctions was any indication that Putin would be refusing to meet with his U.S. counterpart over the summer.

The well-being of both countries is too important to forgo this opportunity. At this point for Biden, sanctions are a means to the end of stabilizing (but not necessarily harmonizing) the future U.S.-Russian relationship. Neither Biden or Putin is yet interested in ending it completely. But something unexpected — Navalny’s death in a Russian prison cell, for example — could change the calculus completely.

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South sudan joined Malawi to be among the only African countries to destroy thousands of expired Covid-19 vaccines.

  –   Copyright © africanews mugeez love news or licensors By Michael Oduor with AFP Last updated: 4 hours ago AstraZeneca South Sudan has joined Malawi to be among the only African countries to destroy thousands of expired Covid-19 vaccines.

When the doses arrived here, we realized that the (remaining) life for the vaccine was only 14 days,” Richard Lako, Covid-19 crisis manager at the health ministry, told AFP.
He said that the drugs had since expired and were “already locked somewhere to be dealt with as soon as possible.” Mr.

Lako said the ministry and the Medicines Authority were developing a plan to dispose of them, including returning them to the AU.

At the end of March, South Sudan, one of the world’s five least developed countries according to the Human Development Index (HDI), received 132,000 doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine through the Covax program, which aims to ensure equitable access to vaccines against Covid-19 especially the among the poor countries.

The vaccination campaign has only taken a week and so far only 2,000 people, mainly medical staff, have been vaccinated.

As in other countries in Africa and around the world, fears of side effects and rumors questioning the safety of the vaccine, or claiming that it causes impotence, have led to mistrust among the population.

“The problem is rumors that people are suffering from side effects, that the vaccine is not safe,” says Lake.

South Sudan has so far registered 10,475 cases of Covid-19, of which 114 have died.

The country has only conducted about 144,000 tests for an estimated population of 12 million.

Independent since its partition from Sudan in 2011 after decades of the liberation war, South Sudan plunged back into a deadly civil war at the end of 2013.

-Malawi vaccine- Malawi destroyed more than 16,000 doses of vaccine after they attained their expiry date.   Of the 102,000 doses sent by the African Union (AU), some 16,400 were not used and expired on April 13, the Ministry told AFP. Of the total 530,000 doses received in the country via the Covax program, the Indian government, and the AU, all of which are AstraZeneca vaccine, only 46% was used. “We have used most of the vaccines sent by the AU.

On Tuesday, when they expired, there were only 16,400 left that had not been used, which will now be destroyed and thrown away,” the minister told AFP. Since the first vaccinations in March, Malawi has only vaccinated 300,000 people out of the 11 million targeted, a target of some 60% of the population “to be sufficiently protected”, according to the minister. Share MORE ABOUT AstraZeneca Covid Vaccine Coronavirus

Juba is considering disposing of over 60,000 doses of Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine that expired before they could be used, an official from the health ministry said on Monday.

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Everything you have to know about 5G



Everything you need to know about 5G.
Here is where you find 5G technology explained—how 5G works, why 5G is important and how it’s changing the way the world connects and communicates. At Qualcomm, we invented the foundational breakthroughs that make 5G possible.
5G FAQS
5G Economic Impact?
Where’s 5G being used?
How fast is 5G?
Is 5G available now?
Do I need a 5G phone?
Q: What is 5G?
A: 5G is the 5th generation mobile network. It is a new global wireless standard after 1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G networks. 5G enables a new kind of network that is designed to connect virtually everyone and everything together including machines, objects, and devices.
5G wireless technology is meant to deliver higher multi-Gbps peak data speeds, ultra low latency, more reliability, massive network capacity, increased availability, and a more uniform user experience to more users. Higher performance and improved efficiency empower new user experiences and connects new industries.
OnQ Blog: 5G in 101 Seconds

More 5G Resources


Expand all

Collapse all

Q: Who invented 5G?



Q: What underlying technologies make up 5G?



Q: What are the differences between the previous generations of mobile networks and 5G?
A: The previous generations of mobile networks are 1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G.
First generation – 1G
1980s: 1G delivered analog voice.
Second generation – 2G
Early 1990s: 2G introduced digital voice (e.g. CDMA- Code Division Multiple Access).
Third generation – 3G
Early 2000s: 3G brought mobile data (e.g. CDMA2000).
Fourth generation – 4G LTE
2010s: 4G LTE ushered in the era of mobile broadband.
1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G all led to 5G, which is designed to provide more connectivity than was ever available before.
5G is a unified, more capable air interface. It has been designed with an extended capacity to enable next-generation user experiences, empower new deployment models and deliver new services.
With high speeds, superior reliability and negligible latency, 5G will expand the mobile ecosystem into new realms. 5G will impact every industry, making safer transportation, remote healthcare, precision agriculture, digitized logistics — and more — a reality.
Qualcomm’s 5G Timeline


Expand all

Collapse all

Q: How is 5G better than 4G?



Everything you need to know about 5G.Here is where you find 5G technology explained—how 5G works, why 5G is important and how it’s changing the way the world connects and communicates. At Qualcomm, we invented the foundational breakthroughs that make 5G possible.5G FAQS5G Economic Impact?Where’s 5G being used?How fast is 5G?Is 5G available now?Do I need a 5G phone?Q: What is 5G?A: 5G is the 5th generation mobile network. It is a new global wireless standard after 1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G networks. 5G enables a new kind of network that is designed to connect virtually everyone and everything together including machines, objects, and devices.5G wireless technology is meant to deliver higher multi-Gbps peak data speeds, ultra low latency, more reliability, massive network capacity, increased availability, and a more uniform user experience to more users. Higher performance and improved efficiency empower new user experiences and connects new industries.OnQ Blog: 5G in 101 SecondsMore 5G Resources

Expand all

Collapse all

Q: Who invented 5G?

Q: What underlying technologies make up 5G?

Q: What are the differences between the previous generations of mobile networks and 5G?A: The previous generations of mobile networks are 1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G.First generation – 1G
1980s: 1G delivered analog voice.Second generation – 2G
Early 1990s: 2G introduced digital voice (e.g. CDMA– Code Division Multiple Access).Third generation – 3G
Early 2000s: 3G brought mobile data (e.g. CDMA2000).Fourth generation – 4G LTE
2010s: 4G LTE ushered in the era of mobile broadband.1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G all led to 5G, which is designed to provide more connectivity than was ever available before.5G is a unified, more capable air interface. It has been designed with an extended capacity to enable next-generation user experiences, empower new deployment models and deliver new services.With high speeds, superior reliability and negligible latency, 5G will expand the mobile ecosystem into new realms. 5G will impact every industry, making safer transportation, remote healthcare, precision agriculture, digitized logistics — and more — a reality.Qualcomm’s 5G Timeline

Expand all

Collapse all

Q: How is 5G better than 4G?

Q: How and when will 5G affect the global economy?A: 5G is driving global growth.• $13.1 Trillion dollars of global economic output
• $22.8 Million new jobs created
• $265B global 5G CAPEX and R&D annually over the next 15 yearsThrough a landmark 5G Economy study, we found that 5G’s full economic effect will likely be realized across the globe by 2035—supporting a wide range of industries and potentially enabling up to $13.1 trillion worth of goods and services.This impact is much greater than previous network generations. The development requirements of the new 5G network are also expanding beyond the traditional mobile networking players to industries such as the automotive industry.The study also revealed that the 5G value chain (including OEMs, operators, content creators, app developers, and consumers) could alone support up to 22.8 million jobs, or more than one job for every person in Beijing, China. And there are many emerging and new applications that will still be defined in the future. Only time will tell what the full “5G effect” on the economy is going to be.










Q: How and when will 5G affect the global economy?
A: 5G is driving global growth.
• $13.1 Trillion dollars of global economic output
• $22.8 Million new jobs created
• $265B global 5G CAPEX and R&D annually over the next 15 years
Through a landmark 5G Economy study, we found that 5G’s full economic effect will likely be realized across the globe by 2035—supporting a wide range of industries and potentially enabling up to $13.1 trillion worth of goods and services.
This impact is much greater than previous network generations. The development requirements of the new 5G network are also expanding beyond the traditional mobile networking players to industries such as the automotive industry.
The study also revealed that the 5G value chain (including OEMs, operators, content creators, app developers, and consumers) could alone support up to 22.8 million jobs, or more than one job for every person in Beijing, China. And there are many emerging and new applications that will still be defined in the future. Only time will tell what the full “5G effect” on the economy is going to be.

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